Friday, September 17, 2004

Allies at IAEA Meeting Reject U.S. Stand on Iran (washingtonpost.com)

Allies at IAEA Meeting Reject U.S. Stand on Iran (washingtonpost.com): "Allies at IAEA Meeting Reject U.S. Stand on Iran
Draft Asks for Suspension of Nuclear Work

By Dafna Linzer
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, September 18, 2004; Page A22

VIENNA, Sept. 17 -- The Bush administration failed on Friday to persuade its closest allies and other members of the International Atomic Energy Agency to increase diplomatic pressure on Iran, settling instead on another request that Tehran voluntarily drop its nuclear program.

A draft resolution, likely to be approved by the IAEA's 35-member board on Saturday, calls on Iran to suspend suspect nuclear work before the board meets again in late November. It also asks the Iranian government to provide U.N. inspectors with additional information about nuclear equipment and technology bought on the international black market.

Iranian officials said they had addressed some of the issues raised by the IAEA and were prepared to meet other requests.

For the past year, the U.S. government has been trying bring the Iranian nuclear issue to the agenda of the U.N. Security Council, arguing that Iran's government is hiding a nuclear weapons program. Bush administration officials had hoped the meeting this week would show progress on the issue before the November presidential election. But European and American diplomats said the negotiations produced more friction than consensus and said they were not sure the United States would have enough support from member countries to move the issue to the Security Council.

The U.S. negotiating team presented a draft resolution at the opening of talks on Monday that would have declared Iran in violation of the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. The U.S. proposal also would have imposed a deadline of Oct. 31 for the Iran to halt all nuclear activities. Failure to meet the deadline would have forced the issue to the Security Council by November.

The U.S. proposals were opposed by a group of influential members, Britain, France, Germany, Canada, Australia, Russia and China. Those governments opted instead to give U.N. inspectors more time to investigate, and then make a final diplomatic effort to persuade Tehran to give up its nuclear ambitions.

Nevertheless, administration officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the three-page resolution was a victory, because it called on Iran to "immediately suspend all enrichment-related activities."

But the resolution does not declare Iran in violation of the Nonproliferation Treaty, nor does it repeat tough diplomatic language that appeared in a June resolution, when the IAEA board characterized Iranian cooperation as deplorable. Mohamed ElBaradei, the IAEA director, complained at that time that Iran had failed to fully cooperate with the agency's investigation.

ElBaradei's most recent report gave the Iranians high marks for improved cooperation. But it warned Iran not to backtrack on ending any suspicious programs. IAEA inspectors have been investigating Iran's nuclear program for two years and have uncovered secret experiments and equipment. The Iranian government claims they are part of a program to produce energy, not weapons.

An Iranian negotiator, Hoseyn Moussavian, noted that the resolution cited the legal right of all countries to develop a nuclear energy program. He said Iran would maintain suspension of its uranium enrichment efforts as a confidence-building measure.

John R. Bolton, the U.S. undersecretary of state for arms control, spent two days in sessions with his European counterparts before the opening of the IAEA board meeting last Monday. U.S. officials hoped for a consensus but they said tensions instead had increased.

At one point, British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw phoned Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and said British diplomats were having difficulty with newly named U.S. negotiators, officials said. The U.S. team is led by Ambassador Jackie W. Sanders, a close associate of Bolton's based in Geneva and in charge of arms control issues.

Diplomats said that British, French and German negotiators overruled key language sought by the United States and disagreed with the United States on most details of the final resolution."

Ex-general criticizes Iraq war in Kerry campaign speech - "incompetence in the conduct of war."

Ex-general criticizes Iraq war in Kerry campaign speech: "Ex-general criticizes Iraq war in Kerry campaign speech


By JOSH FLORY of the Tribune’s staff
Published Friday, September 17, 2004
A former U.S. Air Force general this morning visited Columbia to criticize the Bush administration’s management of the war in Iraq and to tout John Kerry as a better alternative.




McPeak
Retired Gen. Merrill McPeak, a former Air Force Chief of Staff, visited the Roger B. Wilson Boone County Government Center, where he told audience members radical neoconservatives are guiding a foreign policy that has caused American popularity around the world to plummet.
McPeak served 37 years in the Air Force, retiring to Oregon 10 years ago. He said that in 1996 he was Oregon chairman of Bob Dole’s presidential campaign and in 2000 was co-chairman of Veterans for Bush in that state.

American standing in the world is a factor that helped change his mind this year. McPeak said as a military officer he spent years trying to enhance American prestige and influence, and that after Sept. 11 there was a "wellspring of good will" for America around the world. Now, he said, that is evaporating. "Our approval ratings in the world now are in the low single digits," he said.

McPeak was particularly critical of the administration’s Iraq policy, saying the war was a "vanity war" and that it has hampered the war effort in Afghanistan. Later, though, he said he wasn’t against the war itself and was delighted to see Saddam Hussein in handcuffs.

Asked about those positions, McPeak said he would have supported an intervention to remove Hussein "if it had been done in the right way."

"It was the right thing to get rid of Saddam Hussein, don’t get me wrong," he said. "But it’s not enough to do the right thing; you have to do the thing right. And so these guys have shown they don’t know how to do the thing right."

That position tracks closely with the position of Kerry, who voted to authorize the war. Last month, according to the Washington Post, the Democrat said he would have voted that way even if he knew no weapons of mass destruction would be found in Iraq. Kerry, though, has criticized George W. Bush’s handling of the war, saying in a speech in Fulton the president must build a larger coalition to share the burden in Iraq.

McPeak argued this morning that the military force in Iraq is too small, comparing the number of troops there to the forces needed by the British to control Northern Ireland or the number of NATO troops needed to secure Bosnia. "We’re never going to get control of this situation when we’ve got about half the number of guys there needed to get it under control," he said.

About 30 people were in the audience this morning. Peter Dunn, a retired Air Force colonel, said he hates to see "incompetence in the conduct of war." In Iraq, he said, "there’s no victory in sight, nor a dignified exit."

Paul Sloca, a spokesman for the Missouri Republican Party, said the president is committed to staying in Iraq until the job is done, adding that the Iraqi people are grateful for what the United States has done.

"Under President Bush and through the hard work of our fighting men and women, oppression and tyranny have been replaced by freedom and hope," he said."

U.S. is afraid of the power of Islam: Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani

Description of Selected News: "Rafsanjani says Iran will reject any resolution on suspension of uranium enrichment


TEHRAN (IRNA) -- Chairman of the Expediency Council Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani said here Friday that the U.S. is afraid of the power of Islam.

Rafsanjani, speaking at the weekly Tehran Friday Prayer gathering, said the U.S. seeks to spread its hegemony around the globe which is in contradiction to the teachings of Islam.

The Americans are not truthful when they tout slogans declaring an all-out war against terrorism, he said, adding that if they really seek to defeat terrorism they should deal with the MKO or impose pressure on Israel to stop them from further committing acts of terrorism.

Referring to the double standards practiced in U.S. policies, he said U.S. officials do not practice what they preach because they continue to support Israel, which has the biggest stockpile of nuclear weapons.

If the Americans are sincere in their words, they should go after Israel which possesses many weapons of mass destruction, he pointed out.

Lambasting the U.S. double standards in dealing with Iran's and South Korea's nuclear activities, he said that while the Islamic Republic of Iran is fully cooperative with the IAEA and has opened its doors to IAEA inspectors, the country continues to be subjected to pressure but they (Americans) have closed their eyes to the nuclear activities of South Korea.

Moreover, he said the Americans are guilty of misusing the issue of human rights to achieve their hegemonic ambitions around the globe, he said.

The Tehran substitute Friday Prayer leader and chairman of the Expediency Council said in his second sermon that if the IAEA Board of Governors passes a resolution that would call on Iran to terminate its uranium enrichment, the resolution would surely be rejected.

Referring to the IAEA's ongoing meeting in Vienna which focuses on the Iran nuclear case and an upcoming resolution which the Board of Governors is expected to issue, he said that any such resolution which calls on Iran to permanently suspend its uranium enrichment activities would be against the IAEA mandate and will make it subject to an international litigation.

If any such resolution is issued, the Islamic Republic of Iran will have the option of lodging a complaint with the International Court of Justice in The Hague which can proceed against the IAEA for having exceeded its powers under the NPT treaty which guarantees member states the right to pursue nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, he said.

The issuance of a new IAEA resolution is considered as a significant test for members of the IAEA Board of Governors, he said, adding that if they do come up to their responsibilities as the international community's nuclear watchdog, then they should not expect Iran to yield to their demands.

If they wish to impose their hegemony and the law of the jungle, the Islamic Republic of Iran will prove once again that it will not yield to any power and will defend its rights anywhere in the world.

The Islamic Republic of Iran is for peaceful application of nuclear technology under the supervision of the IAEA, he said, adding that the Americans are against Iran's exercise of the right, claiming there is no justification for Iranians wanting to benefit from nuclear technology for civilian purposes.

On the issues affecting Iraq, he said that since the Americans have forgotten the lessons they learned from Vietnam, the Iraqis are there to teach them the lesson anew and which they will remember for the next two or three generations."

Daily Times - US fails to acknowledge Iranian Help in Afghanisan: Mohsen Rezai

Daily Times - Site Edition: "Region: US ‘regime change’ will not stop in Baghdad, says Iranian FM

TEHRAN: The United States’ aim of carrying out “regime change” will not stop in Baghdad, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi said, accusing Washington of seeking to assure Israel’s regional dominance.

Quoted by the official news agency IRNA on Sunday, Kharazi said the United States was “seriously preparing for a war against Iraq”.

“United States policy is not limited to Iraq, as the Americans want to change a number of regimes in the region so that Israel will be dominant,” the foreign minister said, without saying which governments were next on Washington’s list.

“Every country must try to prevent the United States from attacking, by resolving the Iraq problem by diplomatic means,” he added.

But Kharazi said he was confident the United States would not attack Iran, which US President George Bush has lumped into an “axis of evil” along with Iraq and North Korea.

“The United States will not attack Iran, because Iran is not Iraq and has not violated any international rules,” Kharazi asserted. “The US is trying to strike blows against us and does constitute a threat for our country, but this does not mean they will attack us militarily.”

Officially, Iran is opposed to a US attack on Iraq despite national loathing of its President Saddam Hussein and Tehran’s support for Iraqi opposition groups. The two neighbours fought a 1980-1988 war. Meanwhile Mohsen Rezai, a top member of the Expediency Council — Iran’s top political arbitration body — hit out at Washington for failing to recognise Iran’s support during the war against the Taliban.

“The Americans understood that after Afghanistan, they had committed errors in their attitude to Iran. But that is not to say that after Iraq, they will not turn on Iran,” he was quoted as saying in local press. Iran played a key role in the ouster of the Taliban and the formation of the Afghan government of Hamid Karzai, only to find itself branded as “evil” by Bush.

“The American army did not give correct information on the role of the Northern Alliance and Iran to American leaders, who did not understand that without Iranian help, the war in Afghanistan would have lasted months and would have caused much more damage to the Afghan people, America and all the region,” Rezai argued. —AFP
"

US "planned to attack Iran in 2003" : Mohsen Rezai

IranMania News: "US "planned to attack Iran in 2003" : Mohsen Rezai

Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 2002 IranMania.com

Related Pictures




©2002 IranMania
Former Revolutionary Guard chief Mohsen Rezaei.

TEHRAN, May 22 (AFP) - A former head of elite Revolutionary Guards said the United States had planned to attack Iran next year after Afghanistan and Iraq, but had to change its plans due to "Palestinian resistance", the conservative Qods daily reported Wednesday.

Mohsen Rezai, who is also secretary general of the Expediency Council arbitration body chaired by former president Akbar Hashemi-Rafsanjani, said "the United States intended to initiate a war with Iran in 2003 after attacking Afghanistan in 2001 and disposing of the Iraqi regime in 2002".

"But the Palestinian resistance in the (Israeli) occupied lands has destroyed their plans," he was quoted as saying.

In January, US President George W. Bush branded Iran part of an "axis of evil" and named it as a potential target in the US "war on terror". Tehran and Washington cut diplomatic ties following the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran.

Iran was maintained on the list of alleged sponsors of terrorism in the latest annual State Department report published Tuesday."

IHT: U.S. fails to bring UN into Iran nuclear case

IHT: U.S. fails to bring UN into Iran nuclear case: " U.S. fails to bring UN into Iran nuclear case
Craig S. Smith NYT Saturday, September 18, 2004
VIENNA The United States once again failed Friday to persuade the International Atomic Energy Agency to refer Iran's nuclear program to the United Nations Security Council, accepting instead a repetition of calls for the country to stop uranium enrichment activities and clear up questions about its nuclear ambitions.
.
A resolution making those calls is expected to be passed by the agency's 35-member board on Saturday, although several countries were trying late on Friday to water down the resolution's language further.
.
The draft of the resolution as it read Friday would demand a full response by Iran before the agency's board meeting Nov. 25.
.
The United States has been pressing the UN agency for nearly a year to find Iran in breach of its obligations under the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty after the discovery two years ago that the country had hidden much of its nuclear activity for nearly 20 years. Iran has been slow to divulge details of its clandestine research, which the United States is convinced encompasses a nuclear weapons program.
.
But many other countries, led by Britain, France, Germany and Russia, who are not convinced that Iran is intent on building a bomb, favor a softer approach.
.
The international agency has carried out more than a dozen unannounced inspections of Iranian facilities.
.
This week, the agency's head, Mohamed ElBaradei, praised Iran's cooperation and said most issues had been clarified.
.
He said, for example, that traces of highly enriched uranium found on imported centrifuge parts in Iran might well have come from outside the country, as Iran insists.
.
But the United States remains certain that inconsistencies in the program and other clues point to a secret weapons program.
.
The United States suspects a partly buried bunker at a munitions plant in Parchin, 30 kilometers, or 20 miles, southwest of Tehran, could be used to test high-intensity explosives used in a nuclear implosion bomb, in which a sphere of explosives surrounds a core of highly enriched uranium or plutonium.
.
Hossein Mousavian, head of the foreign policy committee of Iran's Supreme National security Council, said Friday that Iran would grant the UN watchdog agency access to the site, though it is not required to do so.
.
"We have never rejected an IAEA inspection," he said.
.
Mousavian argued that Iran was being unfairly penalized, saying that the country had proposed making the Middle East a nuclear weapon-free zone while Israel, which has nuclear weapons, had never signed the Nonproliferation Treaty or accepted agency inspections.
.
"There is clearly a double standard," Mousavian said, adding that Iranian religious leaders had issued a fatwa, or edict, in 1996 that forbade the use of all weapons of mass destruction.
.
"For Iranians, a religious fatwa is more important than any international convention," he said.
.
Former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani of Iran warned Friday in Tehran that Iran would lodge a complaint at the International Court of Justice against the agency for acting outside its powers if the agency demanded that the country stop its enrichment activities.
.
According to the draft of the resolution, Iran must clear up "outstanding issues" in time for ElBaradei to prepare a report for the November meeting and "immediately suspend all enrichment-related activities." It says the agency board will decide in November "whether or not further steps are appropriate."
.
The New York Times



See more of the world that matters - click here for home delivery of the International Herald Tribune.
< < Back to Start of Article VIENNA The United States once again failed Friday to persuade the International Atomic Energy Agency to refer Iran's nuclear program to the United Nations Security Council, accepting instead a repetition of calls for the country to stop uranium enrichment activities and clear up questions about its nuclear ambitions.
.
A resolution making those calls is expected to be passed by the agency's 35-member board on Saturday, although several countries were trying late on Friday to water down the resolution's language further.
.
The draft of the resolution as it read Friday would demand a full response by Iran before the agency's board meeting Nov. 25.
.
The United States has been pressing the UN agency for nearly a year to find Iran in breach of its obligations under the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty after the discovery two years ago that the country had hidden much of its nuclear activity for nearly 20 years. Iran has been slow to divulge details of its clandestine research, which the United States is convinced encompasses a nuclear weapons program.
.
But many other countries, led by Britain, France, Germany and Russia, who are not convinced that Iran is intent on building a bomb, favor a softer approach.
.
The international agency has carried out more than a dozen unannounced inspections of Iranian facilities.
.
This week, the agency's head, Mohamed ElBaradei, praised Iran's cooperation and said most issues had been clarified.
.
He said, for example, that traces of highly enriched uranium found on imported centrifuge parts in Iran might well have come from outside the country, as Iran insists.
.
But the United States remains certain that inconsistencies in the program and other clues point to a secret weapons program.
.
The United States suspects a partly buried bunker at a munitions plant in Parchin, 30 kilometers, or 20 miles, southwest of Tehran, could be used to test high-intensity explosives used in a nuclear implosion bomb, in which a sphere of explosives surrounds a core of highly enriched uranium or plutonium.
.
Hossein Mousavian, head of the foreign policy committee of Iran's Supreme National security Council, said Friday that Iran would grant the UN watchdog agency access to the site, though it is not required to do so.
.
"We have never rejected an IAEA inspection," he said.
.
Mousavian argued that Iran was being unfairly penalized, saying that the country had proposed making the Middle East a nuclear weapon-free zone while Israel, which has nuclear weapons, had never signed the Nonproliferation Treaty or accepted agency inspections.
.
"There is clearly a double standard," Mousavian said, adding that Iranian religious leaders had issued a fatwa, or edict, in 1996 that forbade the use of all weapons of mass destruction.
.
"For Iranians, a religious fatwa is more important than any international convention," he said.
.
Former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani of Iran warned Friday in Tehran that Iran would lodge a complaint at the International Court of Justice against the agency for acting outside its powers if the agency demanded that the country stop its enrichment activities.
.
According to the draft of the resolution, Iran must clear up "outstanding issues" in time for ElBaradei to prepare a report for the November meeting and "immediately suspend all enrichment-related activities." It says the agency board will decide in November "whether or not further steps are appropriate."
.
The New York Times VIENNA The United States once again failed Friday to persuade the International Atomic Energy Agency to refer Iran's nuclear program to the United Nations Security Council, accepting instead a repetition of calls for the country to stop uranium enrichment activities and clear up questions about its nuclear ambitions.
.
A resolution making those calls is expected to be passed by the agency's 35-member board on Saturday, although several countries were trying late on Friday to water down the resolution's language further.
.
The draft of the resolution as it read Friday would demand a full response by Iran before the agency's board meeting Nov. 25.
.
The United States has been pressing the UN agency for nearly a year to find Iran in breach of its obligations under the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty after the discovery two years ago that the country had hidden much of its nuclear activity for nearly 20 years. Iran has been slow to divulge details of its clandestine research, which the United States is convinced encompasses a nuclear weapons program.
.
But many other countries, led by Britain, France, Germany and Russia, who are not convinced that Iran is intent on building a bomb, favor a softer approach.
.
The international agency has carried out more than a dozen unannounced inspections of Iranian facilities.
.
This week, the agency's head, Mohamed ElBaradei, praised Iran's cooperation and said most issues had been clarified.
.
He said, for example, that traces of highly enriched uranium found on imported centrifuge parts in Iran might well have come from outside the country, as Iran insists.
.
But the United States remains certain that inconsistencies in the program and other clues point to a secret weapons program.
.
The United States suspects a partly buried bunker at a munitions plant in Parchin, 30 kilometers, or 20 miles, southwest of Tehran, could be used to test high-intensity explosives used in a nuclear implosion bomb, in which a sphere of explosives surrounds a core of highly enriched uranium or plutonium.
.
Hossein Mousavian, head of the foreign policy committee of Iran's Supreme National security Council, said Friday that Iran would grant the UN watchdog agency access to the site, though it is not required to do so.
.
"We have never rejected an IAEA inspection," he said.
.
Mousavian argued that Iran was being unfairly penalized, saying that the country had proposed making the Middle East a nuclear weapon-free zone while Israel, which has nuclear weapons, had never signed the Nonproliferation Treaty or accepted agency inspections.
.
"There is clearly a double standard," Mousavian said, adding that Iranian religious leaders had issued a fatwa, or edict, in 1996 that forbade the use of all weapons of mass destruction.
.
"For Iranians, a religious fatwa is more important than any international convention," he said.
.
Former President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani of Iran warned Friday in Tehran that Iran would lodge a complaint at the International Court of Justice against the agency for acting outside its powers if the agency demanded that the country stop its enrichment activities.
.
According to the draft of the resolution, Iran must clear up "outstanding issues" in time for ElBaradei to prepare a report for the November meeting and "immediately suspend all enrichment-related activities." It says the agency board will decide in November "whether or not further steps are appropriate."
.
The New York Times VIENNA The United States once again failed Friday to persuade the International Atomic Energy Agency to refer Iran's nuclear program to the United Nations Security Council, accepting instead a repetition of calls for the country to stop uranium enrichment activities and clear up questions about its nuclear ambitions.
.
A resolution making those calls is expected to be passed by the agency's 35-member board on Saturday, although several countries were trying late on Friday to water down the resolution's language further.
.
The draft of the resolution as it read Friday would demand a full response by Iran before the agency's board meeting Nov. 25.
.
The United States has been pressing the UN agency for nearly a year to find Iran in breach of its obligations under the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty after the discovery two years ago that the country had hidden much of its nuclear activity for nearly 20 years. Iran has been slow to divulge details of its clandestine research, which the United States is convinced encompasses a nuclear weapons program.
.
But many other countries, led by Britain, France, Germany and Russia, who are not convinced that Iran is intent on building a bomb, favor a softer approach.
.
The international agency has carried out more than a dozen unannounced inspections of Iranian facilities."

Commerce Minister Mohammad Shariatmadari met with Turkish Foreign Trade Minister

Iran, Turkey Set to Reduce Custom Tariffs to Boost Trade Persian Journal Latest Iran News, news Tehran Iranian News persian news web site sport irani news iranians site farsi women sport woman, newspaper football: "Iran, Turkey Set to Reduce Custom Tariffs to Boost Trade
Sep 17, 2004, 10:14


Commerce Minister Mohammad Shariatmadari met with Turkish Foreign Trade Minister and Customs Affairs Kursad Tuzmen in Istanbul on Wednesday.

At the meeting which was held on the sidelines of the 8th meeting international congress of Moslem entrepreneurs and traders, the two sides expressed satisfaction on the economic and trade cooperation between the two countries acknowledging that the trade volume should be higher, IRNA reported.

Shariatmadari referred to the reduction of trade tariffs between the two states slated to drop by four percent in the next five years saying the agricultural and industrial goods should be included in new tariff regime. Tuzmen, who is also the Turkish chairman of Iran-Turkey Joint economic Commission also said Turkey's priority is to promote on industrial goods. Moreover, It was decided that for a working group of experts to review the issue and inform the commerce ministers of its findings. He conveyed the dissatisfaction of Iranian exporters at Turkey levying 3.5 percent customs duties for each kg of Iranian-made china-ware to the country. He also brought up the issue of reducing the additional interest tacked on by the Turkish `Export-Import Bank' on credits extended for transaction with Iran. The Turkish official promised to look into the matter as soon as possible and expressed hope that the ground will be paved for higher volume of bilateral trade. He further vowed that he will strive to prepare the grounds for tripartite cooperation between Iran, Pakistan and Turkey in creating free trade zone before 2015 which was approved by the just concluded Economic Cooperation Organization (ECO) meeting held in Dushanbe. The 8th international congress of Muslim entrepreneurs and traders kicked off in Istanbul Wednesday with the participation of private and government representative form 50 Islamic countries. In the latest available figures, the trade exchanges between Iran and Turkey were valued at 1.448 billion dollars for the first seven months of 2004, showing a boost of over 11.75 percent compared to their value during a similar period in the previous year. The trade exchanges between the two countries were valued at some 1.296 billion dollars during the same period in 2003. According to a report by the Turkey`s state Institute of statistics released in August, Turkey exported $55.689 million worth of goods in January alone while it imported $178.464 million worth of goods from Iran. The figures stood at $45.846 and $192.245 million, respectively, in January 2003. Some $283.9 million value of goods were exported to Iran by Turkey during the first seven months of 2004 while $1.064 billion worth of goods were imported by Iran. Turkey's exports to Iran reached $271.68 million over the same period. Iran`s exports to Turkey, on the other hand, amounted to $1.024 billion. Iran accounted for 1.1 percent of Turkey's total exports while accounting for 1.8 percent in Turkey's total imports. Turkey's imports from Iran registered a 3.9 percent increase over the same months compared to the figure in the previous year while its exports to Iran reveal an increase of over 41.3 percent.
"