Thursday, July 15, 2004

Shiite leadership clash in Iran, Iraq (Why do they write Stories like this?)

Middle America: Seattle Post-Intelligencer: AP - Shiite leadership in a clash of theology in Iran, Iraq: "Seattle Post-Intelligencer: AP - Shiite leadership in a clash of theology in Iran, Iraq
Seattle Post-Intelligencer: AP - Middle East: Shiite leadership clash in Iran, Iraq:

'Shiite leadership clash in Iran’ strikes me as a divisive way to approach this story. Iraq is primarily an Arab country while Iran is Persian. Keep in mind that Arabs are Semites, an Afro-Asiatic speaking people who are closer to the Jews ethnically then they are to the Persians. The people we call Persians are a mixture of Indo-European and Altaic people who have come together over thousands of years and formed a strong and unified people. So there are differences in the Shiite of Iran and Iraq and some want to exploit those differences. Now this huge block of Shiites is scaring the world and some wish to divide them. Between the Shiite in Arabia, Iran and Iraq they live over much of the world’s oil and the West fears that a united Iran and Iraq may free their oppressed brothers in places like Saudi Arabia and then change the face of world politics changes. So when you see these stories that try to split Shiite Moslems ask yourself why ? "Why split the Shiite?" and "Who stands to gain from any discension?" JBOC


'Shiite leadership clash in Iran, Iraq
By HAMZA HENDAWI
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
An Iraqi man prays inside the Holy Shrine of Imam Ali in the holy city of Najaf, Iraq, Wednesday, July 14, 2004. With Shiites empowered in postwar Iraq, the leadership of the world's estimated 170 million followers is at stake between the Shiite ayatollahs of Iraq and Iran, and the outcome will have profound consequences not only for the two nations but the entire Islamic faith. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim)
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- For centuries, enmity between Arabs and Persians has shaped much of the Middle East - from the Arab conquests of the 7th century to the Iraq-Iran war of the 1980s.

Now, with Shiites empowered in postwar Iraq, the gloves are off again. But this time, the antagonists are the Shiite ayatollahs of Iraq, a mainly Arab country, and Iran, formerly Persia.

At stake is the leadership of the world's estimated 170 million Shiites - and the outcome will have profound consequences not only for the two nations but the entire Islamic faith.

At the heart of the conflict is a rivalry between the holy cities of Najaf in Iraq and Qom in neighboring Iran."

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